Americans’ Lust to ‘Cancel’ One Another Should Spark Soul Searching

It’s the result of our overly politicized culture where many people like to shame and destroy their enemies, but it is undermining the benefits of free and open dialogue.

by Steven Greenhut
Reason.com

After annoying some progressive activists years ago over a column I wrote about a property dispute between a predominantly Latino school district and one of its neighbors, I had to sit through a meeting where I was questioned about my ethnic sensitivity. It was a weird feeling given that my column covered land-use matters and not race or nationality. Fortunately, my critics were polite and the editors had my back. Life went on.

Nevertheless, the incident provided a “note to self” moment. Imagine what can happen to those who say or write something that’s too close to—or slightly over—the (ill-defined) line. I’ve published 200,000 words In recent years, canceling has become quite the phenomenon. It’s the result of our overly politicized culture where many people like to shame and destroy their enemies. Since it seems that we’re all now members of warring political tribes, there are plenty of enemies to go around. Social media platforms make that shaming process fast, fun, and easy.

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